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, "enlightened." the show is in its second season. we are glad you joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day we know that we are only halfwaywalmart committed $2 billion toas we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: please welcome laura dern by on this program. the oscar nominees is enjoying great success on her series called "enlightened." here is a scene from "enlightened." >> where have you been for two days a? >> i was in lna. >> and? >> i do not want to talk to you about this kind of stuff. it would be great if you were happy for me, but it never works out that way. >> happy for what now? >> things are going to change for the better, so when the time is right. >> you have a new boyfriend or what? >> it is more than that. the bigger liar if i dream about. the happy, mom. that is all i need from you. tavis: all right, then. how cool is that? >> it was cool getting to work with my mom. tavis: it really is mom.
. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making preparations today. erika miller reports. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also b
world. >> and -- >> there is not a country in the world that believes that the u.s. drone attacks that we are doing on countries that we are not at war with is the right and sustainable solution for us. >> all we have is the president interpreting his own powers and the limits on his own powers. and that is not the way it's supposed to work. we need more oversight. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org.
the government fail? >> a number of people told us that you didn't make this a top priority. >> well, i'm sorry that they think that because i made it an incredibly top priority. >> that's lanny breuer, the assistant attorney general in charge of the criminal division at the justice department. a week after the frontline report, he stepped down and is now expected to return to private corporate practice, one more government appointee spinning through the lucrative revolving door between washington and wall street. that door could be a big reason why government treats the banks with kid gloves. a man who once worked for citigroup, jack lew, the president's chief of staff, has been picked to be the new treasury secretary. and mary jo white, the newly named head of the securities and exchange commission, is a chief litigator at a top law firm representing big investment banks like morgan stanley. with all this happening, it's time to talk with journalist matt taibbi. you've seen him on our broadcast before. a contributing editor at "rolling stone," he's been tracking the high crimes and misdemeano
eliminating hunger and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: jamie williams is a noted author. she is -- amy wilentz is a noted author. her latest revisits the nation of haiti. it is called "farewell, fred voodoo." we should start by talking about the title. >> friend voodoo is a name the international press corps used to name for the haitian on the street. what i would like to say is they are trained to go deeper than that and not just have a stereotypical view of haitians and what old colonists used to associate with their religion, but something real and in control of their own will, so farewell to the old image. let's look get the new -- look at the new haiti. tavis: what would you say is the typical american view? >> there is a lot of reality. impoverished. we associate in the u.s. poverty with backwardness, especially in a nation filled with akron people is american thing. and there is to do, -- is voodoo, and that image of them being associated with religion thought of assets --
to last. siemens, answers. >> theu.s.economyinthefourthquarte of. the u.s. economy in the fourth quarter of last year october, november, december contracted by 0. 1%. one-tenth of 1%. it was the first contraction in three years and it rattles financial markets. much of the slippage in gross domestic product, was due to what the u.s. federal reserves describes as quote weather related disruptions and other transitory facts unquote. the central bank is keeping monetary policy on hold. and says n worth of long-term securities a month, until there is a substantial improvement in the outlook for the labor market. also, the cut back in department of defense outlays, is likely to fuel concerns about the size of a slow down and the full economic fallout of the large quote unquote sequester cuts scheduled for a month from now, the start of march. the president's press secretary said this about the sequester. quote, across-the-board cuts to education, to research and development, would have repeat, would have, damaging effects on our economy and our long-term economic prospects. unquote. a growing
. using company documents to bolster their case, justice department lawyers says the deal will lead to higher prices for popular beers like budweiser and corona. anheuser-busch inbev says it is still confident the deal will go through. as darren gersh reports, the fight could be a sign more mergers will face a tougher time in washington. >> reporter: the justice department is not quite ready for a two-pack of brewers to control almost half the american beer market. in a statement announcing a lawsuit to block anheuser-bush inbev's $20 billion deal for mexican brewer modelo, assistant attorney general bill baer says >> if abi fully owned and controlled modelo, a.b.i. would be able to increase beer prices to american consumers. this lawsuit seeks to prevent a.b.i. from eliminating modelo as an important competitive force in the beer industry. anheuser-busch was not deterred, saying: >> we remain confident in our position, and we intend to vigorously contest the justice department's action in federal court. >> reporter: the proposed merger between the largest and third largest beer mak
you have joined us for conversation with jeffrey osborne, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jeffrey osborne to this program. he has just released a terrific collection of standards called "a time for love." he is also part of an all-star tour featuring peabo bryson and others, not a bad line up. how is the door going? >> it is going good. it is one of those stores that people are flocking out to sea. you. peabo and freddie with all their hits. we have to cut the showdown, is still long. [laughter] tavis: i have not seen it yet, but i am anxious to see it. what have you decided to cut your hits down to? >> i have to dig deep and go bac
those retail numbers are a positive sign for the u.s. economy. investors were worried about some not so good signals today about europe's economy. stocks turned negative on comments from europe's central bank president saying the strong euro could dampen europe's recovery. here on wall street, the dow fell 42 points, the nasdaq lost three and the s&p slipped over two points. >> tom: still ahead, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and while the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700 last september. late today app
. >> it is because television. >> hold it eleanor. >> the spectacle has lost a lot of the drama and dignity it used to have. he walks down that aisle and gets slaps and high fives. they should have had beyonce doing her number midway through it. >> every other president has walked down that aisle and i don't recall you complaining about it. >> it has lost dignity. >> ike and fdr didn't look like that. >> it is an american tradition and the fact the numbers were down is partly because people don't watch television like they used to. >> eleanor, how were obama's kneels son ratings -- neilsen ratings, the second lowest since they began taking measurement in 1993. the lowest since 2000 when bill you clinton's last drew an audience of 931.5 million. >> i think neilsen should start rating some of the social media sites and look at the exchanges between people who watched it. the american people who watched that and pick up portions that have, here our president is addressing concerns in their lives. i agree the big topics like the eu trade pac that is very important. but i don't think people in the count
.e.o. tim cook sheds little light on how the company plans to use its hoard of cash. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! for the second day in a row, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke told congress the central bank is not about to change its strategy, and for a second day, a strong rally on wall street. the dow surged 175 points to a five year high, the nasdaq added 32, the s&p was up 19 points. investors and traders warmed to the federal reserve chairman's steadfast support of the central bank's bond buying spree, he thinks the asset purchases are necessary to keep interest rates low in order to spur growth and boost hiring. the fed has been buying $85 billion a month in american i.o.u.'s since last september. while it won't stop the strategy, it will soon start talking about how to stop. >> we haven't done a new review of the exit strategy yet. i think we will have to do that sometime soon. even if we don't sell any securities, it doesn't mean that our balance sheet is going to be large for many years, it just would be maybe an extra year, that's all it would take to get down to a mor
, working with our very own defense department, invented the internet in the first place. back then, the u.s. was in the catbird seat, poised to lead the world down this astonishing new superhighway of information and innovation. now many other countries offer their citizens faster and cheaper access than we do. the faster high-speed access comes through fiber optic lines that transmit data in bursts of laser light, but many of us are still hooked up to broadband connections that squeeze digital information through copper wire. we're stuck with this old-fashioned technology because, as susan crawford explains, our government has allowed a few giant conglomerates to rig the rules, raise prices, and stifle competition. just like standard oil in the first gilded age a century ago. in those days, it was muckrakers like ida tarbell and lincoln steffens rattling the cages and calling for fair play. today it's independent thinkers like susan crawford. the big telecom industry wishes she would go away, but she's got a lot of people on her side. in fact, if you go to the white house citizen's petitio
the nation of afghanistan and the air force base in the u.s. state of nevada. drones come in various shapes, sizes and weights. they are used for surveillance, disablement, and killing. and drones are increasingly ubiquitous. there are 64 drone bases spread across the united states alone, and the u.s. has other drone installations across the planet. africa is increasingly a drone base environment. a newly authorized site in the nation of niger will become the sixth u.s. drone base in africa, joining one in morocco, senegal, uganda, and a permanent one in djibouti. u.s. drone attacks ordered by obama have spiked particularly in yemen, somalia, afghanistan, and notably pakistan where over 360 drone strikes over the nine years, 2004 to 2013, have killed over 3,000 people. this data is not classified. and not even secret. but it is troubling. so troubling that the u.n. has just decided to launch an investigation on the impacts of drone strikes on thousands of civilians. question. will the u.n. human rights council rule that drone use violates international law do you think, pat buchanan? >> i d
, and investors are seeing in the u.s. economy. we preview the economic state of the union. why regulators need to treat them like other business. then u.s. airways sees big benefits in merging with american airlines. we look at the new landscape for airlines if the deal goes through. we have that anmore tonight on nbr. president obama is preparing to deliver his first state of the union address of his new term, tomorrow. the american people will be listening carefully to his plans to grow the economy, especially as they struggle with less take home pay, and worries about their jobs. while there are signs of improvement in the economy, the unemployment rate rose in january to 7.9%. so what is the current state of the economy? erika miller talked to two experts with different views. >> reporter: it may seem strange to many investors that the stock market can be hovering at five- year highs, when the economy is so weak. but what's fueling the rally is not the current situation, it's hope. >> we've taken out some of the downside tail risks. so, we're feeling like although it's not going to be a bo
, wall street could use some new headlines to chew on. good economic data would be nice. friendly washington politics would also be helpful. tonight's state of the union speech might give investors a clue as to whether that's likely to happen. veteran trader teddy weissberg is hoping president obama will stress the need for bipartisanship but isn't sure that's what he'll hear. >> in terms of tonight, i don't think anybody that i talk to in the wall street arena expects to hear anything terribly dramatic one way or another. >> reporter: since lawmakers and the white house kicked the proverbial can down the road around new years, the stock market has rallied rather nicely. the s&p 500 is up nearly 7% and the dow is about 150 points away from its all-time high. of course, stocks have been getting help from corporate america, too. it turns out fourth quarter profits were better than expected, led by the housing sector and financial firms. >> about 345 companies have reported so far, of which 70% have beaten earnings expectations and 66% have beaten revenue expectations. both of these
!." there is a u.s. tour also under way. we are glad you joined us. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hungerwalmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. tavis: this month marks the 50th anniversary of the animals. eric burden's career has continued as a solo artist and with a group war. his latest album is called "til your river runs dry!" >> ♪ mother, tell your children, not to do what i have done ♪ ♪ spend your life in sheer misery, in the house of the rising sun ♪ tavis: does it feel like five decades? >> if i look at some of them. >> you did not like that suit? >> not really. thought was a time. it was so rough doing stuff like that. it was shot at 9:00 in the morning, and it was shot in a pan of vision, and why and blends, you are not ready for that kind of stuff. i was happy without sonders and what abo
-democracy, with a new book. we are glad you have joined us. a conversation with former san francisco mayor gavin newsom, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: i am sure none of us has to be reminded just how much twitter, facebook, and instagram an old email as transform our lives. in a new text called "citizenville," gavin newsom looks at how it can help break through gridlock and ensure that everyone in this country as a seat at the decision making. good to have you on. >> thanks. tavis: first of all, congratulations on your wife's recent spirit award. >> yes, she just one of the spirit award, and then they are nominated for their documentary called "the invisible war," which is about raved in the mili
"stagger lee," and he has released a new album called "i'm feeling good." we are glad you could join us for our conversation with lloyd price, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: so llody price was there from the very beginning of rock- and-roll. his song "lawdy miss clawdy" crashed through barriers, going to mainstream radio. he included in hits like it's a personality" and -- like "personality" and "stagger lee," and he was inducted into the hall of fame. maybe this will jog your memory. ♪ rightreat me what you are doing to made i am going to tell everybody ♪ >> now, wikipedia says you turn 80 in march, and i am looking at you, and that cannot be po
in commodities. >> susie: and u.s. companies and infrastructure are increasing under the threat of cyber attack. we look at a new plan tying safeguards to trade policy. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: on the comeback trail, hewlett packard posting better than expected first quarter results tonight, as a wide- ranging revamp of the struggling computer maker takes hold. and its shares take flight, rising over 6% in after hours trading. h.p. earned $0.82 a share, $0.11 better than wall street had anticipated. and revenues, while down at $28.4 billion, also beat the street. c.e.o. meg whitman has been on the job 17 months, speaking with investors today, whitman said she felt good about the rest of the year, and that last year's hard work was paying off for h.p. but, analysts say h.p. is not out of the woods yet. >> it's the type of thing that can be fixed quickly. this isn't going to take several years to play out so first of all it seems like meck whitman's vision is very much on track but we're not seeing that play out in the financials, but it is encouraging that guidance wa
. the u.s. airways/american airlines merger is ready for take-off, and the companies say they see no turbulence ahead from washington regulators. and senate democrats offer their plan to head off the sequester's sharp spending cuts. we get the details from michigan senator debbie stabenow. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r." two big sweetheart deals on this valentine's day: american airlines is merging with u.s. airways, creating the world's largest airline company; and warren buffett is buying h.j. heinz, the biggest food company acquisition ever. we'll have more on american in a moment, but we begin tonight with buffett and that surprising mega-food deal. the billionaire investor is teaming up with the billionaire owners of 3g capital to buy the ketchup maker for $28 billion. the private equity group and buffett's berkshire hathaway are paying $72.50 a share in cash. that's a 20% premium over heinz's closing price yesterday. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: the oracle of omaha now has a new title: ketchup king. for the first time, warren buffett, who's shied away from w
that the people who put food on our tables use food stamps at twice the rate as the rest of the u.s. workforce. meaning that the people who put food on our tables can't afford to put food on their own family's tables. >> funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized indivi
-- including u.s. government officials who in 2007 publicly stated that problems in the subprime market appeared to be contained." >> reporter: s&p goes on to argue that the securities at issue in the justice department's case were reviewed by another ratings agency and received the same rating. s&p says it also began downgrading many mortgage securities in 2006, warning that conditions in the housing market were deteriorating. but critics say what matters is what s&p claimed at the time it stamped securities triple a. >> the ratings agencies claim that they have unique analytic abilities and very sophisticated models that enable them to determine the credit worthiness of a bond, a derivative, a security. >> reporter: s&p points out court rulings have dismissed what it called challenges to a credit rating made with 20/20 hindsight. if the justice department does sue, standard and poor's says it will vigorously defend itself. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: consumers, the street.com's david peltier joins us with some consumer product
rain and snow, but not on saturdays. the u.s. postal service is dropping saturday letter deliveries to save billions. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. fresh pain at the pump. american drivers see a steep jump in gas prices: up 15 cents a gallon in the past week alone. >> susie: and the federal reserve says it's been hit, by cyber hackers. we look at u.s. businesses and just how safe their networks are. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. postal service says this summer it will stop delivering mail on saturdays, ending a service that began 150 years ago. cutting back to a five-day a week schedule will save $2- billion. the post office has been losing about $20 million a day, as e- mail useage ramps up and mail volume plunges. congress has required the post office to deliver six days a week, but the postmaster general believes there is a loophole in the law that will allow him to make the change. darren gersh reports on the business fallout. >> reporter: first class mail is the postal service's most profitable product. it is also a business that is disappearing at the
hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: martha raddatz is an emmy award winning journalist that serves as the chief global affairs correspondent for abc news that has just launched a new project with yahoo called on the radar. she is a frequent guest and part-time post. she also moderated the vice- presidential debate between joe biden and paul ryan. let me just apologize, just before we can live on the air, the satellite feed took a hit with all the news of the day and the news that will be made tomorrow. martha, thank you for doing this under these difficult situations. you'll be happy to know there is a beautiful picture of you on the screen. >> i don't know how any of that works but i know we will make it work somehow. tavis: come the about this project. >> on the radar is our digital project with yahoo and abc news. it is part of our power players and i think the power players get the 100 million hits a year. it is a real opportunity for me to sit down like you get to do
family. we are glad you can join us for our conversation with josh gad, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: josh gad got a tony nomination, and he is now the star of the commonly "1600 penn," and here is a scene from "1600 penn." >> hi. what if i told you i found a way to combine one of my great passions with an employment opportunity? >> just make sure you thought it through. >> i am going off script now. you know i have got the skills. you have always said, "do what you love, and the money will follow." >> that is not the case with magic. >> what is that? i believe this is yours, sir. do you not want to ask how i did that? tavis: is the obama era at the right time -- i am n
. it is called "get up!," served up with the legendary stax record label. we are glad you are able to join us for our conversation with ben harper and charlie musselwhite, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ben harper has teamed up with master charlie musselwhite, for a new cd, titled "get up!," for the legendary stax label. it has been called cinematic in the storytelling, and it has his own brand of soaring harmonica, and to start, year is a collaboration of what this sounds like. ♪ believe a word you say i do not believe i don't believe a word you say i don't believe ♪ >> bringing something out that you would not otherwise have. tavis: ben, we are in ou
. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance ministers and central bankers are meeting in moscow over the weekend. they will be debating the need for austerity, versus the need to spur growth. no one expects a quick turnaround for the european economy, which has been mired in recession. but as erika miller reports, that may make now a good time to invest. >> reporter: it would makes sense that american investors would be loading up on u.s. stocks with the market here doing so well. but they're not. last week, investors in stock mutual funds put virtually all their cash in international markets. more than $3 billion went into funds holding international stocks. by comparison, mutual funds holding u.s. stocks suffered their first outflows of the year. investment advisors say small investors may be on to something. >> international investing has had a bad reputation over the last couple of years had a bad experience, people have taken money ou
to be the secret daughter of strom thurmond, news she shared with us when we were first on the air, as we celebrate now 10 years on this network. this is coming up, right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: mark pinksy is the president and ceo of a nonprofit designed to align money and capital with political, economic, and social justice, opportunity finance network. ofm, and i am sure we will get to that. good to have you on the program. >> good to be here. tavis: i am not the only one continuing to do as much as we can on the issue of poverty, and this includes so much. what often does not get talked about is the fight back. i do not want to be guilty of only talking about the ugly
the difficulties of military debts as they assimilate back into our society. we are glad you joined us. -- military events as they assimilate back into our society. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: anthony edwards currently stars in the new drama "zero hour." this is his first series since starring as martin green in the hit series, er. he is currently involved in making a documentary about the challenges faced by military vets as they integrate into society. let's take a look at a scene ."om "zero hour >> you have been acting different. please just talk to us. >> i saw something, something i cannot explain. the guy looked like you? >> he did not look like me. he looked exactly like me. >> that does not make any sense. >> there
are glad you could join us. the future of catholicism in america, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> with a new pope about to be chosen in rome and the church under severe criticism for its handling of sexual-abuse cases, what is the path forward for the more than 77 million american catholics? a professor of theological ethics at loyola marymount university, raised catholic, dr. gina messina-dysert. deeply engaged in the ongoing debate about the future of catholicism in america. professor, good to have you on this program. >> thank you so much. tavis: let me start with the obvious. many of us, even those of us who are not catholic, this has not happened in 600
industry. >> susie: the u.s. government wants as much as $5 billion from standard and poors, officially accusing the credit ratings agency of fraud during the housing boom. >> tom: and earnings from a trio of consumer stocks finds us spending money on eating out and watching tv. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: a bold new chapter for computer maker dell was opened today. michael dell said today he's taking the company he founded almost 30 years ago private. it's a $24.5 billion deal offering dell investors $13.65 per share. now, at one point, dell was the largest p.c. maker in the world, boasting market capitalization of more than $100 billion. now, it sits behind apple, hewlett packard and lenovo, valued a fifth of what it once was. ruben ramirez begins are coverage. >> reporter: michael dell admits he missed the consumer shift away from the p.c. to tablets and smartphones, but today's announcement his company is going private doesn't necessary address how dell is going to try to capture those markets. >> they want to continue to be a hardware player, but the questio
number one on the billboard charts. and we are glad you joined us for a conversation a "searching for sugar man." king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: malik bendielloul, a documentary filmmaker behind one of the most talked-about documentaries, "searching for sugar man." it tells the remarkable story about rodriguez's remarkable comeback in south africa. the film is of for an oscar this year. here are some scenes. >> if ever there is an air of mystery around a pop artist, it is around the artist known as rodriguez. >> he was a wandering spirit around the city. ♪ >> it is a mystery, but it spread quickly. to many of us south africa as he was the soundtrack of our lives. it was the first who opposition to apartheid. he was a mystery. then we fo
its easy efforts to stimulate the economy had u.s. markets seeing green. the dow gained 116, the nasdaq is up 13, and the s&p rose nine. washington bureau chief darren gersh has details on the fed chairman's strong defense of his aggressive policy to support the economy. >> reporter: sure, there are risks when the federal reserve is buying almost $3 billion worth of bonds every day. but chairman ben bernanke told congress basically, "we got this." >> although a long period of low rates could encourage excessive risk taking, and continued close attention to such developments is certainly warranted, to this point, we do not see potential costs to the increased risk- taking in some financial markets is outweighing the benefits of promoting a stronger economic recovery and more rapid job creation. >> reporter: with unemployment stuck around 8% and inflation subdued at 1.5%, there are no economic red lights flashing. so bernanke gave no signals he was ready to change course or back away from his aggressive program to get the economy back to a more normal level of output. still, t
to be the best cliche for the u.s. job market, right now. the nation's unemployment rate has been lurking just around 8% for the last six months. and, the number of news jobs created is barely keeping pace with population growth. still, some economists think the latest labor data is encouraging. >> when we look at the number of jobs being created even though it was a tad below expectations, it was still a healthy number that should continue to help the economy. >> reporter: the main reason for optimism: those positive revisions to november and december jobs data. it turns out, the government underestimated how many positions were added by 127,000. it was that miscount that helped push the dow over 14,000 for the first time in more than five years. and, at 14,000 the blue-chip index is about 150 to 200 points away from its all-time high. market pros like wayne kaufman predict new highs for stocks in coming weeks. >> many investors, retail investors, individual investors are reaching the point of recognition where they no longer believe the economy is going to collapse again, or that the stock m
, it's the most popular way to give. and charities can use it right away. but charities who can take stock actually really like appreciated securities because you can sell them right away and turn it into cash. >> tom: is that preferred, though, over just the cold hard cash or the credit card contribution? >> well the credit card contribution is good but the credit card company takes a few percent off the top. so if you think you're giving a hundred dollars on-line, you're really giving $97. if you're giving cash, you can give the full amount. but one of the things about appreciated securities is that donors who give appreciated securities often give larger gifts. so charity's like that and it's pretty inexpensive to sell the security. the other nice thing is the donor gets to deduct the full market value of the gift. so if you pay $10 and just a hundred you get to deduct the $100 and avoid capital gains tax. it's way more gifting of appreciated securities than i think people really know. >> tom: we heard the jingle about donating your car. how about other hard assets like that. >>
, "n.b.r.," washington. . >> chairman of macroeconomic advisers joins us tonight from st. louis. you have been looking at the sequester and fiscal cliff for man moons, joel. a pay cut for hundreds of thousands federal employees april 1. that sounds pretty substantial. is it, to the economy? >> well, first of all, it's substantial to the people affected, no question about that. in terms of its impact on the economy, we recently did a study that suggested if the sequester goes into full effect march 1, want impact will be to knock .6% off of growth this year. that is if we thought the economy was going to grow at about 2.6% without the sequester, that will be reduced to 2% with the sequester. >> tom: for this year, we're talking $85 billion potentially taken out of the growth of government spending between march 1 and the end of september and a $4 trillion budget. proportionally for median household income that's the equivalent of $1,000 out of a $50,000 income being taken out. how can that impact economy so much? >> well, it's-- it amounts to something like an 8% cut in the level of g
by groups opposed to economic reform, on top of that, u.s. equities face a looming friday deadline for massive government budget cuts, known as "sequestration." the dow tumbled 216 points, the nasdaq fell nearly 46, and the s&p 500 lost 28 points. while there's been much talk of a correction in the stock market, sequestration may not be the catalyst. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: it is widely accepted on wall street that sequestration is coming. and, with it a new reason for the fragile u.s. economy to sputter. but, what will the first phase of billions of dollars in federal spending cuts actually do to the u.s. stock market? after all, major market averages are hovering close to all-time highs, and don't forget investors are finally warming up to equities again. floor broker art cashin says today's selling was mostly a reaction to italy's election, and that the stock market is not yet focused on sequestration. >> i don't think that even we slip into sequestration it will have the same dramatic effect that the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling had. it is seen as somewhat temp
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> please welcome aaron neville. he has just released a terrific new cd. it serves as the basis for a pbs concert special. here is a sneak preview of malik true story." i got a girl and ruby is her name ♪ ♪ she don't love me but i love her just the same ♪ ♪ i am going to haunt you ♪will you be mine tavis: i saw the cd. i felt like you have been keeping something from us if this is a true story. what have we been getting all s?e other years chairma >> the first time i wanted to record our wanted to do doo- wop. i even did a doo-wop version of the mickey mouse march. >> why doo-wop? >> doo-wop nurtured me and threw me into who i am. the teacher thought i had a d d. tavis: what is it about the style that resonated in which you? >> i was not king cole, and who sam cooke. doo-wop was something that sued in may. it made everything all right. tavis: you mentioned an icon. since you mentioned him, i read somewhere where allen tried to get you to change t
will get a look at high- profile nominations. we are glad you joined us. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> bernie sanders is the longest serving independence in congress in his third term after 16 years in the house. he is also the new chair of the veterans affairs committee. it is always good to have you on this program. thanks for your time. >> great to be with you. >> let me start with where we are now. we are caught between the president's inauguration day speech and his state of the union address. i want to cover both in just a second and so much more, but let me start with the inauguration speech. this is the first time we have gotten a chance to talk in person. we did not get a chance to talk that day, so let me start by asking your thoughts about
states on the series created by shonda rhimes. we are glad you joined us. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tony goldwyn is an actor who stars on "scandal." is now in its second season and airs thursday night's. >> here is what is great about having someone attempt to assassinate you. doctors are yelling, and you could die, and you suddenly stop being afraid. then when you do not die, you realize you have nothing to lose and no time to waste. this is going to happen. i am going to divorce and remain president of the united states. that is my job. do your job. work out the details. make it happen during your -- make it happen. >> you are out of your mind. a sitting president cannot divorce his wife. >> i think you are probably righ
saying, "we think our stock is overvalued, let's use it while we can to buy the competition." >> reporter: there may be a lot more corporate marriages in the months ahead, but stovall says the stock market still needs to digest its recent gains. >> i think that we could end up seeing a relatively mild correction in prices, something on the order of 5% or maybe more. but then we're going to see a lot of investors say, "it's time to jump back in because i missed most of this move." >> reporter: stovall also says any stock market correction needs a trigger. what that may be, however, is anyone's guess. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: dell is among those companies involved in the deal- making this year. its founder and a group of investors wants to take dell private. in the meantime, the company reported better than expected quarterly earnings late today. dell earned 40 cents per share last quarter. while that's down considerably from a year ago, it is slightly better than wall street estimates. still, business continues to be tough. the lone business dell saw revenue grow last qua
congress gathers to hear the president, used to be known as "the people's house." but money power owns the lease now and runs the joint from hidden back rooms. you're looking at the most expensive congress money can buy. the house races last fall cost over $1 billion. it took more than $700 million to elect just a third of the senate. the two presidential candidates raised more than a billion a piece. the website politico added it all up to find that the total number of dollars spent on the 2012 election exceeded the number of people on this planet -- some seven billion. most of it didn't come from the average joe and jane. 60% of all super pac donations came from just 159 people. and the top 32 super pac donors gave an average of $9.9 million dollars. think how many teachers that much money could hire. we'll never actually know where all of the money comes from. one-third of the billion dollars from outside groups was "dark money," secret funds anonymously funneled through fictional "social welfare" organizations. those are front groups, created to launder the money inside the deep po
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